Keith Fullerton WhitmanOcclusionsEditions Mego
 Utterly messy and proudly chaotic, “Occlusions” follows Keith Fullerton Whitman’s Editions Mego debut, “Generators,” by only a few mere months.  There are many similarities between the two full-lengths: each feature two side-long renditions of the same sounds used in radically different ways and both were captured live with a handheld Zoom recorder.  The style and approach are different, however, with “Generators” appearing extremely orderly and composed when compared to the rapid digital jump cuts and unpredictable synthesizer drop outs that define both sides of “Occlusions.”  The random, stream-of-consciousness explorations reveal something that would be close to mutated techno if any of the sounds that litter “Occlusions” could keep a consistent rhythm.  It’s still thoroughly engaging electronic music, but worlds away from the tone and style he debuted a decade ago on his seminal “Playthroughs” album.  - Ryan Potts

Keith Fullerton Whitman
Occlusions

Editions Mego

 Utterly messy and proudly chaotic, “Occlusions” follows Keith Fullerton Whitman’s Editions Mego debut, “Generators,” by only a few mere months.  There are many similarities between the two full-lengths: each feature two side-long renditions of the same sounds used in radically different ways and both were captured live with a handheld Zoom recorder.  The style and approach are different, however, with “Generators” appearing extremely orderly and composed when compared to the rapid digital jump cuts and unpredictable synthesizer drop outs that define both sides of “Occlusions.”  The random, stream-of-consciousness explorations reveal something that would be close to mutated techno if any of the sounds that litter “Occlusions” could keep a consistent rhythm.  It’s still thoroughly engaging electronic music, but worlds away from the tone and style he debuted a decade ago on his seminal “Playthroughs” album.  - Ryan Potts

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