Tropic of CancerPermissions of LoveMannequin
Tropic of Cancer have been on quite the trajectory over the last few years and “Permissions of Love” continues that tract and then some. Camella Lobo is the brains behind ToC (though she gets some assistance from the likes of John Mendez & Taylor Burch) and she’s as dialed in as ever on A-Side banger, “The One Left.” This is the dystopia we were all promised in the heyday by the late 80s/early 90s cyberpunk fetishistas. Lobo reverb-soaked voice is throttled by the bass drum throb and pierced through-and-through with melancholic shards of guitar chords. It appears rather straight-forward, but after some dense surface mining the track is dense with fraught emotion. On the flip, “Beneath the Light” sounds like something from Peaking Lights time-machine cold wave alter-ego. Slow and deliberate vocal melodies wrap the tune in black gauze while piano loops underneath - it’s an enchanting cocktail for sure. The closing piece, “It’s All Come Undone,” makes an excellent bookend and is more akin “The One Left,” though certainly holds its own. These murky, greyscale concoctions are Tropic of Cancer’s calling card and Lobo shows now signs of fading away. “Permissions of Love” is excellent. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Tropic of Cancer
Permissions of Love

Mannequin

Tropic of Cancer have been on quite the trajectory over the last few years and “Permissions of Love” continues that tract and then some. Camella Lobo is the brains behind ToC (though she gets some assistance from the likes of John Mendez & Taylor Burch) and she’s as dialed in as ever on A-Side banger, “The One Left.” This is the dystopia we were all promised in the heyday by the late 80s/early 90s cyberpunk fetishistas. Lobo reverb-soaked voice is throttled by the bass drum throb and pierced through-and-through with melancholic shards of guitar chords. It appears rather straight-forward, but after some dense surface mining the track is dense with fraught emotion. On the flip, “Beneath the Light” sounds like something from Peaking Lights time-machine cold wave alter-ego. Slow and deliberate vocal melodies wrap the tune in black gauze while piano loops underneath - it’s an enchanting cocktail for sure. The closing piece, “It’s All Come Undone,” makes an excellent bookend and is more akin “The One Left,” though certainly holds its own. These murky, greyscale concoctions are Tropic of Cancer’s calling card and Lobo shows now signs of fading away. “Permissions of Love” is excellent. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

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