Alex DurlakSecondsKomino
In many ways, Alex Durlak’s latest one-sided 12” appears like a throwback to bygone experimental approaches a decade old. In the years since, many in the ambient electronic field seem to hide the latter word, yearning to disguise the digital and outstrip its in-the-box feel. “Seconds,” the final third release in a trilogy, spends the entirety of its 20 minute run digitally deconstructing his guitar with a series of granular processes that corrode and vaporize any and all ties to the familiar six-stringed instrument. I would imagine Durlak’s shelves are rife with releases by Kevin Drumm, Oren Ambarchi, and Rafael Toral as his work is similarly static, tremulous, and grinding. As the debut release for Komino Records, “Seconds” is a bold and unapologetic take on a classic drone technique. - Ryan Potts, Experimedia

Alex Durlak
Seconds

Komino

In many ways, Alex Durlak’s latest one-sided 12” appears like a throwback to bygone experimental approaches a decade old. In the years since, many in the ambient electronic field seem to hide the latter word, yearning to disguise the digital and outstrip its in-the-box feel. “Seconds,” the final third release in a trilogy, spends the entirety of its 20 minute run digitally deconstructing his guitar with a series of granular processes that corrode and vaporize any and all ties to the familiar six-stringed instrument. I would imagine Durlak’s shelves are rife with releases by Kevin Drumm, Oren Ambarchi, and Rafael Toral as his work is similarly static, tremulous, and grinding. As the debut release for Komino Records, “Seconds” is a bold and unapologetic take on a classic drone technique. - Ryan Potts, Experimedia

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