Kassel JaegerDeltasEditions Mego
I’ve long been a fan of work that rides the fine line between noise and electro-acoustic improvisation/composition. Though the hybridization seems less popular the further we move away from the early-to-mid-2000’s glory days of the EAI scene, recent albums that have explored this unique terrain have been almost uniformly well-received. I’m thinking specifically of Jason Lescalleet’s latest offerings and the acclaimed Ankersmit/Tricoli duo’s Forma II from last year. Well, there might be another addition to that list shortly. With the ferocity of the former and the palette of the latter, Kassel Jaeger’s Deltas is every bit as worthy of a unanimous heralding. The LP is comprised of three tracks, each of which has a strong conceptual base is delivered with a deceptively frantic focus. The planetarium-commissioned, meteoric manipulations of the A-side Campo Del Cielo are a far cry from the laser light shows we get here in the Midwest and the title track draws inspiration from the stalemate created when two bodies of water collide. It’s definitely a work on the high-minded side of things, but the tracks never get too caught up in themselves and are executed with a gritty approachability that’s just as remarkable as the conceptualization throughout. - Mike Shiflet, Experimedia 

Kassel Jaeger
Deltas

Editions Mego

I’ve long been a fan of work that rides the fine line between noise and electro-acoustic improvisation/composition. Though the hybridization seems less popular the further we move away from the early-to-mid-2000’s glory days of the EAI scene, recent albums that have explored this unique terrain have been almost uniformly well-received. I’m thinking specifically of Jason Lescalleet’s latest offerings and the acclaimed Ankersmit/Tricoli duo’s Forma II from last year. Well, there might be another addition to that list shortly. With the ferocity of the former and the palette of the latter, Kassel Jaeger’s Deltas is every bit as worthy of a unanimous heralding. The LP is comprised of three tracks, each of which has a strong conceptual base is delivered with a deceptively frantic focus. The planetarium-commissioned, meteoric manipulations of the A-side Campo Del Cielo are a far cry from the laser light shows we get here in the Midwest and the title track draws inspiration from the stalemate created when two bodies of water collide. It’s definitely a work on the high-minded side of things, but the tracks never get too caught up in themselves and are executed with a gritty approachability that’s just as remarkable as the conceptualization throughout. - Mike Shiflet, Experimedia 

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