Marsen JulesThe Endless Change of Colour12kThough an ubiquitous reference point for nearly all ambient music, the influence of Brian Eno in both sound and approach hang particularly heavy around “The Endless Change of Colour.”  The hour long “Thursday Afternoon” and last year’s “Lux” are clear precedents to Marsen Jules’ first release on 12k as his 47 minute work floats, hovers, and hangs suspended in air while rarely ebbing in volume or density.  Jules has made a name for himself in the past decade with several releases, most notably for City Centre Offices, that solidified him as an electronic composer who utilized instruments and samples to arrive at a sound that took on an air of stately classical music.  Nearly all that has dissolved on “The Endless Change of Colour.”  No hints of melody or rhythm are reared as Jules focuses on pure tone, like a time stretched bell whose echo lingers into infinity.  – Ryan Potts, Experimedia

Marsen Jules
The Endless Change of Colour
12k

Though an ubiquitous reference point for nearly all ambient music, the influence of Brian Eno in both sound and approach hang particularly heavy around “The Endless Change of Colour.”  The hour long “Thursday Afternoon” and last year’s “Lux” are clear precedents to Marsen Jules’ first release on 12k as his 47 minute work floats, hovers, and hangs suspended in air while rarely ebbing in volume or density.  Jules has made a name for himself in the past decade with several releases, most notably for City Centre Offices, that solidified him as an electronic composer who utilized instruments and samples to arrive at a sound that took on an air of stately classical music.  Nearly all that has dissolved on “The Endless Change of Colour.”  No hints of melody or rhythm are reared as Jules focuses on pure tone, like a time stretched bell whose echo lingers into infinity. – Ryan Potts, Experimedia

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