Jan St. WernerBlaze Colour BurnThrill Jockey
Jan St. Werner hasn’t released an album under his given name since the early ’90s, which is why most people will be more familiar with his work as part of German electronic legends Mouse On Mars.  But what a return it is: “Blaze Colour Burn” is a sound collage work of misshapen contours and forward-thinking experiments that is somehow as composed and deliberate as any classical piece.  Just listing the techniques Jan St. Werner used – not to mention the sounds themselves – could take up an entire paragraph: DSP manipulations, improvisation, soundtrack work, graphic scoring, signal processing, field recordings, digital time stretching, vocal cut ups, and about a hundred other aural methods.  ”Spiazzacorale A” is the most beguiling track on this incredibly diverse and engaging album, placing a snippet of a public orchestra concert in Italy amid searing electronic textures, rippling bell arrangements, and passages of microscopic sonic particles.  ”Blaze Colour Burn” it’s so visionary and imaginatively well executed, don’t be surprised if most electronic fare sounds stale in comparison.  – Ryan Potts, Experimedia 

Jan St. Werner
Blaze Colour Burn
Thrill Jockey

Jan St. Werner hasn’t released an album under his given name since the early ’90s, which is why most people will be more familiar with his work as part of German electronic legends Mouse On Mars.  But what a return it is: “Blaze Colour Burn” is a sound collage work of misshapen contours and forward-thinking experiments that is somehow as composed and deliberate as any classical piece.  Just listing the techniques Jan St. Werner used – not to mention the sounds themselves – could take up an entire paragraph: DSP manipulations, improvisation, soundtrack work, graphic scoring, signal processing, field recordings, digital time stretching, vocal cut ups, and about a hundred other aural methods.  ”Spiazzacorale A” is the most beguiling track on this incredibly diverse and engaging album, placing a snippet of a public orchestra concert in Italy amid searing electronic textures, rippling bell arrangements, and passages of microscopic sonic particles.  ”Blaze Colour Burn” it’s so visionary and imaginatively well executed, don’t be surprised if most electronic fare sounds stale in comparison. – Ryan Potts, Experimedia 

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