APHEX TWINSYROofficially unofficeall listeninn partE…09.20.14.8pmat The Experimedia Empire Compound…………..44266with live sets byKHAKI BLAZER………………..……………..KentMOLTAR………………..…………..West VirginiaGLACIAL 23…………………………….Clevelandzuperb sound courtesy The Experimedia Sound SysteMMMMand live audioReactive visuals………………beamsbonfire……………….…………………..woodtikitorches…………………………………oilcigarette party………………………….tobaccobeer………………….…………………..hops8pm - Midnight Parking is limited… carpool where possible.You will either have to get directions from someone in the know or go to the little bodega nearby and ask to purchase a single crouton and you will be provided directions to the secret location.

APHEX TWIN
SYRO
officially unofficeall listeninn partE…09.20.14.8pm
at The Experimedia Empire Compound…………..44266
with live sets by
KHAKI BLAZER………………..……………..Kent
MOLTAR………………..…………..West Virginia
GLACIAL 23…………………………….Cleveland
zuperb sound courtesy The Experimedia Sound SysteMMMM
and live audioReactive visuals………………beams
bonfire……………….…………………..wood
tikitorches…………………………………oil
cigarette party………………………….tobacco
beer………………….…………………..hops

8pm - Midnight 
Parking is limited… carpool where possible.
You will either have to get directions from someone in the know or go to the little bodega nearby and ask to purchase a single crouton and you will be provided directions to the secret location.

Experimedia Films present Strange Lines and Distances, an award winning two-channel audio-visual installation by artist Joshua Bonnetta which examines Guglielmo Marconi’s first transatlantic radio broadcast. The work is inspired by Marconi’s belief that sound never diminishes, but rather grows incrementally fainter and fainter. He believed that with an adequately sensitive receiver, one could amplify the echoes of history. Strange Lines and Distances looks at and listens to the past, revisiting Marconi’s original transmission sites in order to explore the hauntological aspects of radio and landscape. The installation invites a consideration of the monumental impact of the first wireless transmission, and explores the medium’s potential to conflate and fragment both space and time. The dual channels represent the transmission site in Poldhu Cove, U.K. and the receiving site at Fever Hospital, St. John’s, NL. Each historical site is documented using 16mm colour negative film. The sonic composition was created from site-specific field recordings, shortwave and longwave radio recordings and archival material.

Presented as a lavish limited edition featuring:
-DVD of the film
-12” Vinyl LP containing an extended score
-Printed inner sleeve with Monograph by Jeffrey Sconce
-Uncoated Gatefold Sleeve
-HD Video & Audio Download Coupons
+Optional Blu-Ray Add-on

Available March 18 2014 from Experimedia.net.

Strange Lines and Distances has been featured at Images Festival, Berlin International Film Festival, Rotterdam International Film Festival and was awarded the Deluxe Cinematic Vision Award.

Presented by Experimedia Films in association with Images Festival, Umor Rex Records and Evil Llama.

Launch screening and talk with the artist will take place at the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art on February 27 2014.

Strange Lines and Distances official selection at Berlin and Rotterdam Film Festivals

Joshua Bonnetta’s latest film project Strange Lines and Distances is an official selection at the Berlin and Rotterdam film festivals.

Strange Lines and Distances is the follow up to Joshua’s American Colour released last year as a lavish LP & DVD edition on Giuseppe Ielasi’s Senufo Editions.

Strange Lines and Distances will be released later this year on Experimedia as a special edition gatefold LP and DVD. Until then enjoy this brief excerpt from the film.

Strange Lines and Distances-Rough Excerpt. 16mm to HD. 5.1. Two channel installation. 2012. 30 minutes (excerpt) from joshua bonnetta on Vimeo.

Strange Lines and Distances is a two-channel audio-visual installation focusing on Guglielmo Marconi’s first transatlantic radio broadcast. The work is inspired by Marconi’s belief that sound never diminishes, but rather grows incrementally fainter and fainter. He believed that with an adequately sensitive receiver, one could amplify the echoes of history. Strange Lines and Distances looks at and listens to the past, revisiting Marconi’s original transmission sites in order to explore the hauntological aspects of radio and landscape. The installation invites a consideration of the monumental impact of the first wireless transmission, and explores the medium’s potential to conflate and fragment both space and time. Strange Lines and Distances takes its title from a passage in Francis Bacon’s utopian text New Atlantis, in which Bacon imagines a futuristic society’s culture, politics, history and media. In contradistinction, Strange Lines and Distances moves backwards, retrospectively exploring the invention of radio while looking for echoes and historical intimations of the past within the present.

Strange Lines and Distances’ dual channels represent the transmission site in Poldhu Cove, U.K. and the receiving site at Fever Hospital, St. John’s, NL. Each historical site is documented using 16mm colour negative film. The sonic composition was created from site- specific field recordings, shortwave and longwave radio recordings and archival material. Mired in static and atmospheric interference, the recordings exist as fragmentary spectres of outport beacons, noise, musical passages and human voice. Visually, each channel contains imagery that resonates and rhymes with the opposing channel in terms of shape, line, colour, light and optical geometry. Through a visual examination of the sites’ topographical similarities, the work plays with the juxtaposition of landscape, architectural ruins, flora, and geological and meteorological phenomena. The images unfold as a series of long shots, and this play with duration creates a montage that asks the spectator to consider distance and the poetics of form.

Ben BennettSpoilage LPExperimedia
 *Out Now! Limited edition of 300. Includes immediate download.* Columbus, Ohio artist Ben Bennett creates an exquisite racket armed with a mutant kit of recycled and modified acoustic instruments and found objects. I first experienced Ben’s work when he performed at the Rubber City Noise Cave in Akron, OH on February 11 2012. After witnessing Ben simultaneously double bowing a drum head, blowing on mutant wind instruments using circular breathing techniques, dragging himself across the floor through the crowd and smacking ball bearings onto the floor I immediately knew I needed to document and present Ben’s work. Unlike anything I have released before and a thrilling new direction for Experimedia. To truly understand the experience that is Ben’s work I recommend watching some of the performance videos below. Enjoy. - Jeremy Bible 
"It takes a certain amount of guts and attitude to call the opener on your newest record "Have you ever considered taking a break from listening to music for a while?" Yet it perfectly encapsulates what makes the latest from Columbus, Ohio’s Ben Bennett, Spoilage, such an interesting record. Bennett uses no electronics in his creations and improvisation plays a vital role. This is music that is messy and organic and human. 
The list of instruments and implements that Bennett uses through Spoilage is mind-boggling. Everything from various drums to a wheelbarrow, pizza cutter, and “the narrow part of a balloon” is in play. Considering this, the cacophonous symphony that ensues isn’t as out-of-control as one might think. No, this is carefully-constructed from beginning to end, each choice made at the spur of a moment and pushed to extremes. Spoilage is a maximalist exhibition, extorting visceral sounds from the tools at his disposal. 
Bennett flips back and forth in his song-titles from the specific and mundane to something more universal. All of it, though, is where this music comes from. Personal, political, whatever - it all goes hand-in-hand. The scattered, blown-out percussive blasts could be the bombs falling just as easily as that moment you realize the last bus arrived two minutes early and you were one minute late. Quiet scrapes flicker between gulfs of silence, leaving room for philosophical contemplation or drawing up a reward sign for your stolen bike. In the end, it’s all matter that fades through time. Everything is Spoilage.” - Brad Rose 
Ben Bennett started playing music as a young child, took up the drums in middle school, and has always been attracted to improvisation. His interest in jazz moved steadily towards the more avant-guarde, then to free jazz, and onward into the world of free-improv. His current music stems mainly from various forms of free-improv: maximalist, reduced, noise, etc. A desire to get the most varied and visceral array of sounds from the simplest instruments has led to an ongoing process of distilling the drumset to its essential sound-maker, the vibrating membrane. Using extended techniques involving breath and friction, as well as the time-honored tradition of hitting things with sticks, he plays an evolving pile of frame drums, pre-tuned drum heads, metal things, tubes, and other objects that can be combined and recombined to get a variety of sounds during a performance. This set-up lends itself greatly towards being crammed in a backpack, strapped to a bike, dragged along the ground, or thrown down the stairs, generally without physical or psycological damage. 
Recent projects include: bst.cr - trio with Ryan Jewell and Wilson Shook, Wrest - with Jack Wright and Evan Lipson, Rotty What - trio with Jack Wright and John M Bennett; Central Ohio War Coalition - with Mike Shiflet, Joe Panzner, and others; duos with Ryan Jewell, Jack Callahan, and Ben Hall; and solo performances.

Ben Bennett
Spoilage LP

Experimedia

 *Out Now! Limited edition of 300. Includes immediate download.* Columbus, Ohio artist Ben Bennett creates an exquisite racket armed with a mutant kit of recycled and modified acoustic instruments and found objects. I first experienced Ben’s work when he performed at the Rubber City Noise Cave in Akron, OH on February 11 2012. After witnessing Ben simultaneously double bowing a drum head, blowing on mutant wind instruments using circular breathing techniques, dragging himself across the floor through the crowd and smacking ball bearings onto the floor I immediately knew I needed to document and present Ben’s work. Unlike anything I have released before and a thrilling new direction for Experimedia. To truly understand the experience that is Ben’s work I recommend watching some of the performance videos below. Enjoy. - Jeremy Bible 

"It takes a certain amount of guts and attitude to call the opener on your newest record "Have you ever considered taking a break from listening to music for a while?" Yet it perfectly encapsulates what makes the latest from Columbus, Ohio’s Ben Bennett, Spoilage, such an interesting record. Bennett uses no electronics in his creations and improvisation plays a vital role. This is music that is messy and organic and human. 

The list of instruments and implements that Bennett uses through Spoilage is mind-boggling. Everything from various drums to a wheelbarrow, pizza cutter, and “the narrow part of a balloon” is in play. Considering this, the cacophonous symphony that ensues isn’t as out-of-control as one might think. No, this is carefully-constructed from beginning to end, each choice made at the spur of a moment and pushed to extremes. Spoilage is a maximalist exhibition, extorting visceral sounds from the tools at his disposal. 

Bennett flips back and forth in his song-titles from the specific and mundane to something more universal. All of it, though, is where this music comes from. Personal, political, whatever - it all goes hand-in-hand. The scattered, blown-out percussive blasts could be the bombs falling just as easily as that moment you realize the last bus arrived two minutes early and you were one minute late. Quiet scrapes flicker between gulfs of silence, leaving room for philosophical contemplation or drawing up a reward sign for your stolen bike. In the end, it’s all matter that fades through time. Everything is Spoilage.” - Brad Rose 

Ben Bennett started playing music as a young child, took up the drums in middle school, and has always been attracted to improvisation. His interest in jazz moved steadily towards the more avant-guarde, then to free jazz, and onward into the world of free-improv. His current music stems mainly from various forms of free-improv: maximalist, reduced, noise, etc. A desire to get the most varied and visceral array of sounds from the simplest instruments has led to an ongoing process of distilling the drumset to its essential sound-maker, the vibrating membrane. Using extended techniques involving breath and friction, as well as the time-honored tradition of hitting things with sticks, he plays an evolving pile of frame drums, pre-tuned drum heads, metal things, tubes, and other objects that can be combined and recombined to get a variety of sounds during a performance. This set-up lends itself greatly towards being crammed in a backpack, strapped to a bike, dragged along the ground, or thrown down the stairs, generally without physical or psycological damage. 

Recent projects include: bst.cr - trio with Ryan Jewell and Wilson Shook, Wrest - with Jack Wright and Evan Lipson, Rotty What - trio with Jack Wright and John M Bennett; Central Ohio War Coalition - with Mike Shiflet, Joe Panzner, and others; duos with Ryan Jewell, Jack Callahan, and Ben Hall; and solo performances.

Ben Bennett - Spoilage (LP edition of 300 out January 2013)
Test pressings of the Ben Bennett LP arriving tomorrow. Can’t wait to hear this spinning. Columbus, OH artist Ben Bennett creates an exquisite racket armed with a mutant kit of recycled and modified acoustic instruments and found objects. I first experienced Ben’s work when he performed at the Rubber City Noise Cave in Akron, OH on February 11 2012. After witnessing Ben simultaneously double bowing a drum head, blowing on mutant wind instruments using circular breathing techniques, dragging himself across the floor through the crowd and smacking ball bearings onto the floor I immediately knew I needed to help document and present Ben’s work. Unlike anything I have released before and a thrilling new direction for Experimedia. To truly understand the experience that is Ben’s work I recommend watching some of the performance videos embedded below. Enjoy.

Ben Bennett - Spoilage (LP edition of 300 out January 2013)

Test pressings of the Ben Bennett LP arriving tomorrow. Can’t wait to hear this spinning. Columbus, OH artist Ben Bennett creates an exquisite racket armed with a mutant kit of recycled and modified acoustic instruments and found objects. I first experienced Ben’s work when he performed at the Rubber City Noise Cave in Akron, OH on February 11 2012. After witnessing Ben simultaneously double bowing a drum head, blowing on mutant wind instruments using circular breathing techniques, dragging himself across the floor through the crowd and smacking ball bearings onto the floor I immediately knew I needed to help document and present Ben’s work. Unlike anything I have released before and a thrilling new direction for Experimedia. To truly understand the experience that is Ben’s work I recommend watching some of the performance videos embedded below. Enjoy.

Dat PoliticsBlitz Gazer(Sub Rosa) 
Simply, “Blitz Gazer,” the new album from French duo DAT Politics, is a lot of damn fun. DAT Politics have been around for over a decade and “Blitz Gazer” is something of a reboot for the band, who were previously a trio. These stylized pop confections grind their way into your head with their insanely catchy hooks and big fat beats. It’s a tried-and-true combination but DAT Politics absoultely kill it on “Blitz Gazer.” From the anthemic leads on “Switch On” to the auspicious, ’80s-tinge of “Between Us,” they manage to cover a lot of ground. Sure, every song here has a heavy pop-bend to it, but the songwriting is so good and the execution so flawless that this is head & shoulders above all the pretender-pop records that come out every other week. Hints of modern R&B bleed through the chaotic and bizarre “Corpsicle” - one of the album’s standouts - which lead into the robotic haze of “Melt Down.” Plus, I’m a sucker for layer-upon-layer of vocoder and DAT Politics play that trick in spades. I think the reason this album stands out so much in the end is that there’s an ambivalence that pervades the entire album and it really, really works. You get the feeling that these two could not give a fuck and are just having fun, doing whatever they want - everyone else be damned. It’s their attitude and talent as songwriters that make “Blitz Gazer” such a good time and an album you’ll return to over and over. Oh, and this was recorded in Berlin which somehow says it all. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Dat Politics
Blitz Gazer

(Sub Rosa) 

Simply, “Blitz Gazer,” the new album from French duo DAT Politics, is a lot of damn fun. DAT Politics have been around for over a decade and “Blitz Gazer” is something of a reboot for the band, who were previously a trio. These stylized pop confections grind their way into your head with their insanely catchy hooks and big fat beats. It’s a tried-and-true combination but DAT Politics absoultely kill it on “Blitz Gazer.” From the anthemic leads on “Switch On” to the auspicious, ’80s-tinge of “Between Us,” they manage to cover a lot of ground. Sure, every song here has a heavy pop-bend to it, but the songwriting is so good and the execution so flawless that this is head & shoulders above all the pretender-pop records that come out every other week. Hints of modern R&B bleed through the chaotic and bizarre “Corpsicle” - one of the album’s standouts - which lead into the robotic haze of “Melt Down.” Plus, I’m a sucker for layer-upon-layer of vocoder and DAT Politics play that trick in spades. I think the reason this album stands out so much in the end is that there’s an ambivalence that pervades the entire album and it really, really works. You get the feeling that these two could not give a fuck and are just having fun, doing whatever they want - everyone else be damned. It’s their attitude and talent as songwriters that make “Blitz Gazer” such a good time and an album you’ll return to over and over. Oh, and this was recorded in Berlin which somehow says it all. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Jon PorrasBlack Mesa(Thrill Jockey)
As half of the scorched-desert duo, Barn Owl, Jon Porras has cultivated an impressive catalog of sprawling, rusted, drone-infused compositions. There’s a reason that Barn Owl are so highly regarded and Porras keeps those high standards with his latest solo opus, “Black Mesa,” for Thrill Jockey. The information included with the album says that is a ‘reflection on desolation.’ Sonically, this is exactly what it is. This is dark and lonely blues-ridden guitar music at its finest. Out of all the influences listed for this record, the Sandy Bull mention hits closest to him. Music like this spreads its wings underneath a gauzy spritual haze. If Porras is playing the part of the lost wanderer, the atmospheric embellishments and expansive, open-air feeling that pervades the record is his landscape. There is richness in the subtle details of “Black Mesa;” some chimes here or a handdrum there add life to the charred aural canvas. Throughout its entirety, “Black Mesa” is building massive funeral pyres aimed at burning up the darkest hour of the night. Once the embers glow, everything goes up in flames. Porras pours on the gasoline as the album closer, “Beyond the Veil,” stretches all the way to the dawn. This is one hell of a record. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Jon Porras
Black Mesa

(Thrill Jockey)

As half of the scorched-desert duo, Barn Owl, Jon Porras has cultivated an impressive catalog of sprawling, rusted, drone-infused compositions. There’s a reason that Barn Owl are so highly regarded and Porras keeps those high standards with his latest solo opus, “Black Mesa,” for Thrill Jockey. The information included with the album says that is a ‘reflection on desolation.’ Sonically, this is exactly what it is. This is dark and lonely blues-ridden guitar music at its finest. Out of all the influences listed for this record, the Sandy Bull mention hits closest to him. Music like this spreads its wings underneath a gauzy spritual haze. If Porras is playing the part of the lost wanderer, the atmospheric embellishments and expansive, open-air feeling that pervades the record is his landscape. There is richness in the subtle details of “Black Mesa;” some chimes here or a handdrum there add life to the charred aural canvas. Throughout its entirety, “Black Mesa” is building massive funeral pyres aimed at burning up the darkest hour of the night. Once the embers glow, everything goes up in flames. Porras pours on the gasoline as the album closer, “Beyond the Veil,” stretches all the way to the dawn. This is one hell of a record. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Masaki BatohBrain Pulse Music(Drag City)
In the promotional video for Brain Pulse Music, Masaki Batoh attaches a humorous looking piece of gear to his head, stating “there is a small sensor in front which will pick up your EEG (Electroencephalography = Brain Wave).” He then demonstrates the device running through a “motherboard,” which is essentially a crude synthesizer, with pitch, frequency, and volume control effects. Voilà! The electric impulses in your head are made audible. This translation of brainwaves into raw sound forms the intellectual basis for Brain Pulse Music, but the actual record is much more than seemingly aleatoric synthesizer/brain squiggles. The theme of the work seems to be meditation; the centering of one’s mind through music. Batoh attempts to achieve this state through his EEG machine, but also with understated percussion and woodwind passages. Throughout the “Kumano Codex” tracks, for example, a sense of beautiful timelessness is conjured; if someone told me they were ancient religious chants or the soundtrack to a Kurosawa film neither option would seem too far a stretch. Simply, Brain Pulse Music reveals the struggle and harmony between mind (synth/brainwaves) and body (percussion, woodwinds). - Keith Rankin, Experimedia

Masaki Batoh
Brain Pulse Music

(Drag City)

In the promotional video for Brain Pulse Music, Masaki Batoh attaches a humorous looking piece of gear to his head, stating “there is a small sensor in front which will pick up your EEG (Electroencephalography = Brain Wave).” He then demonstrates the device running through a “motherboard,” which is essentially a crude synthesizer, with pitch, frequency, and volume control effects. Voilà! The electric impulses in your head are made audible. This translation of brainwaves into raw sound forms the intellectual basis for Brain Pulse Music, but the actual record is much more than seemingly aleatoric synthesizer/brain squiggles. The theme of the work seems to be meditation; the centering of one’s mind through music. Batoh attempts to achieve this state through his EEG machine, but also with understated percussion and woodwind passages. Throughout the “Kumano Codex” tracks, for example, a sense of beautiful timelessness is conjured; if someone told me they were ancient religious chants or the soundtrack to a Kurosawa film neither option would seem too far a stretch. Simply, Brain Pulse Music reveals the struggle and harmony between mind (synth/brainwaves) and body (percussion, woodwinds). - Keith Rankin, Experimedia

Koi PondSo Higher(Sonic Meditations)Well this is unexpected. This is the perfect dose of scuzzed-out jams. And I do mean JAMS. Koi Pond first came to light on a solid tape on Night People, but “So Higher” is on another level entirely. Plodding, dub-infused drums are the backbone while solid bass grooves hum along at pace. I could probably listen to that pairing for an hour and not get tired of it, but when you add serious synth shredding to the mix it’s like opening the blast furnace and sticking your face straight in. And that’s just the A-Side! Flip the record and you are off to another planet entirely. Holy shit. First dip into the rabbit hole and fuzzed-to-the-floor guitars are up in your face, pulling the skin off in sheets. The narco-dub rhythms continue, but the fire dancing on top is something nastier. As the track moves along, you’re thrust into deep space where everything echoes to infinity. There’s an eerie calmness that creeps in, but it’s nothing but a ruse. Koi Pond bring the whole thing to a close by turning their guitars into spires that cut open the sky, dripping liquid crystal straight into your skull. Yes please. - Brad Rose, for Experimedia

Koi Pond
So Higher

(Sonic Meditations)

Well this is unexpected. This is the perfect dose of scuzzed-out jams. And I do mean JAMS. Koi Pond first came to light on a solid tape on Night People, but “So Higher” is on another level entirely. Plodding, dub-infused drums are the backbone while solid bass grooves hum along at pace. I could probably listen to that pairing for an hour and not get tired of it, but when you add serious synth shredding to the mix it’s like opening the blast furnace and sticking your face straight in. And that’s just the A-Side! Flip the record and you are off to another planet entirely. Holy shit. First dip into the rabbit hole and fuzzed-to-the-floor guitars are up in your face, pulling the skin off in sheets. The narco-dub rhythms continue, but the fire dancing on top is something nastier. As the track moves along, you’re thrust into deep space where everything echoes to infinity. There’s an eerie calmness that creeps in, but it’s nothing but a ruse. Koi Pond bring the whole thing to a close by turning their guitars into spires that cut open the sky, dripping liquid crystal straight into your skull. Yes please. - Brad Rose, for Experimedia