Golden CupVagabondBlackest Rainbow
Listening to a short clip or even a few minutes of Golden Cup’s Vagabond won’t do you much good. This is the type of long-form psychedelic “jam” music that you’ve got to willingly enter for the long haul. Once inside you will discover many trademarks of the genre: wandering guitar/bass instrumentation that never quite shreds but seems perpetually in the midst of a stoned solo, loose Mitch Mitchell-style drumming, and a lot of swirling sounds and bongos. The single-track A side is pretty standard psychedelic fare, but side B starts by mixing things up with minimal rhythms and some flute and synth interplay (at least I think it’s a synth). The music becomes more interesting when you’re given breathing room, an idea that the last track nails; even though there’s an insistent guitar drone accompanied by loose hand-drumming, each element melds together effortlessly, giving us a taste of Golden Cup at their most zoned in. - Keith Rankin

Golden Cup
Vagabond

Blackest Rainbow

Listening to a short clip or even a few minutes of Golden Cup’s Vagabond won’t do you much good. This is the type of long-form psychedelic “jam” music that you’ve got to willingly enter for the long haul. Once inside you will discover many trademarks of the genre: wandering guitar/bass instrumentation that never quite shreds but seems perpetually in the midst of a stoned solo, loose Mitch Mitchell-style drumming, and a lot of swirling sounds and bongos. The single-track A side is pretty standard psychedelic fare, but side B starts by mixing things up with minimal rhythms and some flute and synth interplay (at least I think it’s a synth). The music becomes more interesting when you’re given breathing room, an idea that the last track nails; even though there’s an insistent guitar drone accompanied by loose hand-drumming, each element melds together effortlessly, giving us a taste of Golden Cup at their most zoned in. - Keith Rankin