Robert Curgenven + Richard Chartier
Built Through

(Line)

One phrase really jumps out at me when reading over the information included with the new album from Richard Chartier & Robert Curgenven: Acoustic Architecture. That is exactly what “Built Through” is. Chartier and Curgenven use a multitude of processes to dissect and digest a wide range of sound. At times, they’re taking apart past compositions of Chartier’s and processing them ‘through three improvisations for a 16 foot single manual pipe organ.’ The results speak for themselves, adding new space and depth to any already impressive piece. Field recordings of Curgenven’s are reworked by Chartier, contrasting digital sounds and processes with something that feels entirely organic. This is sonic engineering at its finest. There’s a real delicacy to each of the four pieces on “Built Through,” and with each successive listen a new layer is revealed. - Brad Rose, Experimedia

Frank Bretschneider
Kippschwingungen

(Line)

For his new release on LINE, Frank Bretschneider presents an album of compositions sourced from the Subharchord, an obscure “electronic instrument developed during the 1960’s at the RFZ, the technical center for radio and television of the East German postal service.” These sounds, augmented by material culled from Clavia Micro Modular synthesizer, were arranged into the eight part composition “Kippschwingungen.” Austere and alien, Bretschneider’s compositions are uncompromising in execution. Pulsing white noise and click rhythms abound here, evolving slowly over time but ultimately resulting in a type of sonic stasis. By “Part 7,” things open up a bit more, with Bretschneider allowing his oscillators to finally breathe. Formally immaculate and unyielding in focus, “Kippschwingungen” fits perfectly with LINE’s body of work. - Alex Cobb, Experimedia

Pinkcourtesyphone
Foley Folly Folio

(Line) 

Pinkcourtesyphone is the bizarrely-named alter-ego of Richard Chartier. There’s enough similarities between this and Chartier’s solo material that fans of his work will find a lot to dig into on “Foley Folly Folio.” Among many descriptions of Pinkcourtesyphone, perhaps the one that rings most true is “Pinkcourtesyphone operates like a syrupy dream.” This is especially true on the cryptic opener, “Wistful Wishful Wanton.” A looped, childlike voice endlessly repeats the line “The most wonderful night of my life” on top of a bed of melodic, slow-moving electronics. There’s an almost dystopian, sci-fi feeling to it with the cold and clinical nature that envelopes the piece. The album gets more menacing as it saunters ahead, crawling along at a glacial pace and filling in any discordant cracks. These pieces may be sprawling, but they’re quite dynamic as well. “Foley Folly Folio” acts as a separate, but still related, meditation on minimalism that Chartier does so well. Great cover art, too. - Brad Rose, Experimedia