Plvs VltraParthenonSpectrum Spools
You’re probably already familiar with the voice at the center of PLVS VLTRA, as it belongs to Toka Yasuda of Enon and Blonde Redhead fame. Pantheon is her debut solo album for Spectrum Spools, and she injects the label with a serious dose of eclectic electronic pop. Yasuda’s voice, being high pitched and japanese, has unavoidable ties to Jpop artists like Shiina Ringo or the more electronic Takako Minekawa, which works to the record’s advantage when placed next to its adventurous instrumentation. Simply put, the sound palette here is all over the place. I like when it gets a bit weird and dancey, especially on “Sweet Tooth”, “Parthenon”, and “Like Space”, which are adorned with interesting shuffling grooves, found-sound samples, and bubbling synth-tom sounds. Every nook and cranny of Pantheon is filled with some interesting element, making it a pretty dense listen (especially for a “pop” album). But that’s the charm, and repeated listens reveal a smart compositional sensibility hiding in the Yasuda’s tangled jungle of sound. - Keith Rankin

Plvs Vltra
Parthenon

Spectrum Spools

You’re probably already familiar with the voice at the center of PLVS VLTRA, as it belongs to Toka Yasuda of Enon and Blonde Redhead fame. Pantheon is her debut solo album for Spectrum Spools, and she injects the label with a serious dose of eclectic electronic pop. Yasuda’s voice, being high pitched and japanese, has unavoidable ties to Jpop artists like Shiina Ringo or the more electronic Takako Minekawa, which works to the record’s advantage when placed next to its adventurous instrumentation. Simply put, the sound palette here is all over the place. I like when it gets a bit weird and dancey, especially on “Sweet Tooth”, “Parthenon”, and “Like Space”, which are adorned with interesting shuffling grooves, found-sound samples, and bubbling synth-tom sounds. Every nook and cranny of Pantheon is filled with some interesting element, making it a pretty dense listen (especially for a “pop” album). But that’s the charm, and repeated listens reveal a smart compositional sensibility hiding in the Yasuda’s tangled jungle of sound. - Keith Rankin